Viruslist News

  • Financial cyberthreats in 2016


    In 2016 we continued our in-depth research into the financial cyberthreat landscape. We've noticed over the last few years that large financial cybercriminal groups have started to concentrate their efforts on targeting large organizations – such as banks, payment processing systems, retailers, hotels and other businesses where POS terminals are widely used.
  • New(ish) Mirai Spreader Poses New Risks


    A cross-platform win32-based Mirai spreader and botnet is in the wild and previously discussed publicly. However, there is much information confused together, as if an entirely new IoT bot is spreading to and from Windows devices. This is not the case. Instead, an accurate assessment is that a previously active Windows botnet is spreading a Mirai bot variant.
  • Spam and phishing in 2016


    2016 saw a variety of changes in spam flows, with the increase in the number of malicious mass mailings containing ransomware being the most significant. These programs are readily available on the black market, and in 2017 the volume of malicious spam is unlikely to fall.
  • Dissecting Malware


    From March 30 through April 2, 2017, one of them — Principal Security Researcher at Kaspersky Lab Nicolas Brulez — will deliver a course on the subject he has been training people around the world on for 12 years, malware reverse engineering.
  • Mobile apps and stealing a connected car


    The concept of a connected car, or a car equipped with Internet access, has been gaining popularity for the last several years. By using proprietary mobile apps, it is possible to get some useful features, but if a car thief were to gain access to the mobile device that belongs to a victim that has the app installed, then would car theft not become a mere trifle?
  • Breaking The Weakest Link Of The Strongest Chain


    Around July last year, more than a 100 Israeli servicemen were hit by a cunning threat actor. The attack compromised their devices and exfiltrated data to the attackers’ C&C. In addition, the compromised devices were pushed Trojan updates. The operation remains active at the time of writing this post.
  • A look into the Russian-speaking ransomware ecosystem


    In other words, crypto ransomware is a fine tuned, user friendly and constantly developing ecosystem. In the last few years we, at Kaspersky Lab, have been monitoring the development of this ecosystem. This is what we’ve learned.
  • Features of secure OS realization


    There are generally accepted principles that developers of all secure operating systems strive to apply, but there can be completely different approaches to implementing these principles.
  • Fileless attacks against enterprise networks


    This threat was originally discovered by a bank’s security team, after detecting Meterpreter code inside the physical memory of a domain controller (DC). Kaspersky Lab participated in the forensic analysis, discovering the use of PowerShell scripts within the Windows registry. Additionally it was discovered that the NETSH utility as used for tunnelling traffic from the victim’s host to the attacker´s C2.
  • Rocket AI and the next generation of AV software


    What would happen if we did the same thing that the respected AI experts did? We could come to agreements with other representatives in the cybersecurity area and create a joint project. Meet Rocket AV.

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