Security News

  • No Free Pass for ExPetr


    Recently, there have been discussions around the topic that if our product is installed, ExPetr malware won’t write the special malicious code which encrypts the MFT to MBR. Some have even speculated that some kind of conspiracy might be ongoing.… Read Full Article

  • The Magala Trojan Clicker: A Hidden Advertising Threat


    Magala falls into the category of Trojan Clickers that imitate a user click on a particular webpage, thus boosting advertisement click counts. It’s worth pointing out that Magala doesn’t actually affect the user, other than consuming some of the infected computer’s resources. The main victims are those paying for the advertising.
  • Bitscout – The Free Remote Digital Forensics Tool Builder


    Being a malware researcher means you are always busy with the struggle against mountains of malware and cyberattacks around the world. Over the past decade, the number of daily new malware findings raised up to unimaginable heights: with hundreds of thousands of malware samples per day!
  • In ExPetr/Petya’s shadow, FakeCry ransomware wave hits Ukraine


    While the world was still shaking under the destructive ExPetr/Petya attack that hit on June 27, another ransomware attack targeting Ukraine at the same time went almost unnoticed.
  • From BlackEnergy to ExPetr


    To date, nobody has been able to find any significant code sharing between ExPetr/Petya and older malware. Given our love for unsolved mysteries, we jumped right on it. We’d like to think of this ongoing research as an opportunity for an open invitation to the larger security community to help nail down (or disprove) the link between BlackEnergy and ExPetr/Petya.
  • ExPetr/Petya/NotPetya is a Wiper, Not Ransomware


    After an analysis of the encryption routine of the malware used in the Petya/ExPetr attacks, we have thought that the threat actor cannot decrypt victims’ disk, even if a payment was made. This supports the theory that this malware campaign was not designed as a ransomware attack for financial gain. Instead, it appears it was designed as a wiper pretending to be ransomware.
  • Schroedinger’s Pet(ya)


    Earlier today (June 27th), we received reports about a new wave of ransomware attacks spreading around the world, primarily targeting businesses in Ukraine, Russia and Western Europe. Our investigation is ongoing and our findings are far from final at this time. Despite rampant public speculation, the following is what we can confirm from our independent analysis.
  • Neutrino modification for POS-terminals


    From time to time authors of effective and long-lived Trojans and viruses create new modifications and forks of them, like any other software authors. One of the brightest examples amongst them is Zeus, which continues to spawn new modifications of itself each year.
  • KSN Report: Ransomware in 2016-2017


    In early 2017, Kaspersky Lab’s researchers have discovered an emerging and dangerous trend: more and more cybercriminals are turning their attention from attacks against private users to targeted ransomware attacks against businesses.
  • Ztorg: from rooting to SMS


    I’ve been monitoring Google Play Store for new Ztorg Trojans since September 2016, and have so far found several dozen new malicious apps. All of them were rooting malware that used exploits to gain root rights on the infected device. In May 2017, a new Ztorg variant appeared on the Google Play Store – only this this time it wasn’t a rooting malware but a Trojan-SMS.
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